#Book Review: Operation Trumpsformation by Ross O’Carroll-Kelly

Op TrumpI’m not sure how popular Ross O’Carroll-Kelly is ‘out foreign’, but since 1998 this satirical creation of journalist Paul Howard has been shining a spotlight on Ireland’s society through the privileged lens of a rich Dublin southside rugby player. This is the fourteenth book in the series (and the RO’CK juggernaut isn’t only books) so he is definitely doing something right, and the formula remains in place for this latest outing.

There’s plenty to take offence at (Ross is still deeply unpleasant and that’s just the start of it) and plenty to laugh at too. Ireland’s Marriage Equality referendum; gender identity; Trump and Brexit are all key parts of this particular mix, plus causal references to Irish celebs (“the Happy Pear goys, Vegward I call them”). I confess I had fallen out of touch with the character for his last couple of outings, and reading this book reminded me how funny he can be. If you are a RO’CK fan you will love this; if you are new to him it’s as good a place as any to start.

Operation Trumpsformation is published by Penguin Ireland. I received a copy of this book from the publisher in return for an honest review.

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Like Other Girls – Claire Hennessy

display-77a293ccc54cee3754d2eb8c557acf69I was lucky enough to get an advanced copy of this book, and gobbled it up in a day – but thanks to the unexpected appearance of the wondrous orb of the sun in Irish skies I haven’t been inside with my laptop to tell you about it. The rain is back, so now you get to hear about a book I have wanted to read since I heard the author say what it would be about at DeptCon2 last October.  I knew this would be a YA book that would bring home the reality of the Eight Amendment – I didn’t expect it to do the same for gender identity and mental health, but after reading it I will be recommending it to every teenager I know. (If you’re not Irish and wonder what the Eighth Amendment is, click here.)

“I am a groupless, friendless creature in a sea of chat…”

Lauren has all the usual teenage reasons to feel awkward in her own skin, plus a few more – her mother has become principal of her all-girls school; her classmates don’t know she is bisexual; her boyfriend is a grade A git, and her capacity for critical thinking isn’t exactly going down well with her religious teachers. All this before she faces every teenage girls worst nightmare. Pregnancy with nowhere to turn is always terrible, but in a country with the most restrictive reproductive rights in the EU riddled with misinformation it is horrific. Hennessy does an admirable job of telling Lauren’s story with clarity and dignity. Lauren is a smart, acerbic girl who, while occasionally confused by her sexuality, is never ashamed of it. She is not perfect – and this is what makes her an authentic character. She is not just a cipher on which to hang an ‘issues’ book.

“I have felt trapped in this body since I was 10 years old and discovered that, contrary to the impression that Judy Blume had given me, periods were neither magical nor one-off things that happened to turn you into a woman.”

Aside from one scene (when Lauren is called to the office by her mother to discuss a personal matter, something so out of character it was jarring) this book is close to flawless YA, and excels at capturing the feeling of being different/other/wrong. One of its key strengths is the gradual revelation of many other people who feel just as alienated as Lauren – although for different reasons. Many of Lauren’s darkest moments are when she stays in her room, obsessively pouring over social media; the brightest are when she opens up to those around her. This book is a perfect promotion of the importance of open communication and friendship to mental health. YA is at its best when you know it is shining a beacon of empathy and understanding to young people who feel alone, and we have never had a book that has dealt with the reproductive realities of modern Ireland. Like Other Girls is a book that needed to be written – now it needs to be read!

Like Other Girls is published by Hot Key Books and is available in good bookstores. I received a copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. 

Books by Women (for International Women’s Day)

It’s International Women’s Day, and to celebrate it Rick O’Shea started a little experiment in his book club* this morning – asking us to pick one book by a woman, past or present, that you absolutely, positively, definitely think should be read by someone wanting to read more by women authors, and share it on social media. I failed spectacularly at picking just one, so it’s gonna have to be a blog post!

International Women’s Day celebrates the social, economic, cultural and political achievement of women. Yet progress has slowed in many places across the world, so global action is needed to accelerate gender parity. In the European Union in 2016, the number of extra days a woman must work to match the amount of money earned by men in the previous year was 67. Ireland, my country, has a constitution that enshrines a woman’s place as being in the home; has an abysmally low conviction rate for rape and sexual assault, and some of the most restrictive abortion legislation in the EU. Contraception was illegal in Ireland until 1980, when it was legalised only with strong restrictions – all firmly pro-birth, not pro-life, as the catalogue of horrors inflicted on women and children in laundries and Mother and Baby ‘Homes’ proves. Last week’s sickening discovery that 796 babies were dumped in a septic tank in one of these ‘Homes’ in Tuam, is horrifying not only for the barbarity of the act itself but because this happened in our time, our parents time. This is a recent darkness – the last Magdalene laundry only closed in 1996. This International Women’s Day we should all remember Gloria Steinem’s words “The future depends entirely on what each of us does every day; a movement is only people moving.” We all need to use our voices to stand up for women, to speak the truth even if our voices shake.

For-most-of-history-Anonymous-was-a-woman

I love Rick’s experiment for this very reason – women’s words are important. Women’s work is important. Women’s health is important. Women are important. Here are some books by women that I think everyone should read. Happy International Women’s Day.

FICTION:

handmaids taleThe Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

A searing speculative fiction about totalitarianism, this is one of the few books I can definitively state changed the way I see the world. Vivid and terrifying – and uncomfortably plausible. “That was when they suspended the Constitution. They said it would be temporary. There wasn’t even any rioting in the streets. People stayed home at night, watching television, looking for some direction. There wasn’t even an enemy you could put your finger on”

paradiseParadise by Toni Morrison

A brilliant portrayal of race and gender spanning the 1960s and 70s, Paradise begins with the brutal attack on a group of young women in a convent near an all-black town, and unpicks the events leading up to it through the interior lives of the citizens of the town. “They shoot the white girl first. With the rest they can take their time. No need to hurry out here. They are 17 miles from a town which has 90 miles between it and any other. Hiding places will be plentiful in the Convent, but there is time and the day has just begun.”

needleworkNeedlework by Deirdre Sullivan

Irish writing is having a bit of a moment, and Deirdre Sullivan is an unmistakably authentic voice who deserves more recognition.  Needlework is beautiful, painful and full of things we need to be aware of. I can’t talk about this book without raving about it, so here’s a more thoughtful review I made earlier.

wideWide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys

A must read for fans of Jane Eyre, this book gives a voice to Bronte’s ‘madwoman in the attic’. Antoinette Cosway, a white Creole heiress, marries Mr. Rochester… and is slowly driven mad, a madness arising from her voice being silenced, and others speaking for her. Moody, introspective, and sad – “There are always two deaths, the real one and the one people know about.”

buddha atticThe Buddha in the Attic by Julie Otsuka

So beautifully written it hurts, this book, spanning the years between WWI and WWII tells the story of a group of Japanese ‘picture brides’, who travel to America speaking no English clutching pictures of husbands-to-be they knew nothing about. The use of collective voice makes their stories all the more heartbreaking: “We forgot about Buddha. We forgot about God. We developed a coldness inside us that still has not thawed. I fear my soul has died. We stopped writing home to our mothers. We lost weight and grew thin. We stopped bleeding. We stopped dreaming. We stopped wanting.”

NON-FICTION:

beauyThe Beauty Myth by Naomi Wolf

Smart and righteously angry, this book examines the beauty industry and the rise of a social control based on appearance that is just as oppressive and damaging as traditional roles trapped within the home, showing that the beauty myth is always prescribing behaviour, not appearance. “A culture fixated on female thinness is not an obsession about female beauty, but an obsession about female obedience. Dieting is the most potent political sedative in women’s history; a quietly mad population is a tractable one.”

sexual politicsThe Sexual Politics of Meat by Carol J Adams

The idea of meat as a macho food is overt, and this book looks at the interplay between contemporary society’s ingrained cultural misogyny and its obsession with meat and masculinity. This is a truly seminal work for me – while I don’t agree with all of Adams’ ideas, this is an important and provocative book that has inspired and enraged across the political spectrum for more than 25 years. “Feminist-vegetarian activity declares that an alternative worldview exists, one which celebrates life rather than consuming death; one which does not rely on resurrected animals but empowered people.”

wild swansWild Swans by Jung Chang

This book has it all – if it were fiction it would be an impossibly perfect story, this is utterly unforgettable and one of the few books I would call a masterpiece. Through three generations of Chinese women – a grandmother who was given to a warlord as a concubine, her communist mother, and the daughter herself – we encounter bravery, love, hope, nightmarish cruelty, the will to survive, and an understanding of the epic sweep of China’s twentieth century. “As a child, my idea of the West was that it was a miasma of poverty and misery, like that of the homeless ‘Little Match Girl’ in the Hans Christian Andersen story. When I was in the boarding nursery and did not want to finish my food, the teacher would say: ‘Think of all the starving children in the capitalist world!”

* The Rick O’Shea Book Club is the nicest corner of the internet, and Ireland’s largest online book club with almost 6000 members. Each month, Rick (the Book Warrior!) recommends two books for us to read (see our previous choices here), but the conversation ranges far beyond those selections and the meet-ups, author interviews and blind book swaps are always brilliant. Want to join the club? Just head over to Facebook, and be prepared for your TBR pile to just grow and grow!