Reader, I married him…

…and here’s a picture of the greatest vegan wedding cake of all time to prove it 😉

CathyGandMarcB wedding cakeIt’s been a crazy few months – a lot of things happening at once, not least of which finishing up wedding preparations and then escaping the realities of work for a blissful month of honeymoon. As a result the blog has been sidelined, and I have a huge backlog of reviews to get written up and share with you. Apologies to the publishers and authors waiting on me – I hope to get caught up and re-open for submissions soon.

In the meantime here’s one of my favourite poems about love and marriage – many reviews to follow shortly!

‘A Marriage’ – Michael Blumenthal

You are holding up a ceiling
with both arms. It is very heavy,
but you must hold it up, or else
it will fall down on you. Your arms
are tired, terribly tired,
and, as the day goes on, it feels
as if either your arms or the ceiling
will soon collapse.

But then,
unexpectedly,
something wonderful happens:
Someone,
a man or a woman,
walks into the room
and holds their arms up
to the ceiling beside you.

So you finally get
to take down your arms.
You feel the relief of respite,
the blood flowing back
to your fingers and arms.
And when your partner’s arms tire,
you hold up your own
to relieve him again.

And it can go on like this
for many years
without the house falling.

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Like Other Girls – Claire Hennessy

display-77a293ccc54cee3754d2eb8c557acf69I was lucky enough to get an advanced copy of this book, and gobbled it up in a day – but thanks to the unexpected appearance of the wondrous orb of the sun in Irish skies I haven’t been inside with my laptop to tell you about it. The rain is back, so now you get to hear about a book I have wanted to read since I heard the author say what it would be about at DeptCon2 last October.  I knew this would be a YA book that would bring home the reality of the Eight Amendment – I didn’t expect it to do the same for gender identity and mental health, but after reading it I will be recommending it to every teenager I know. (If you’re not Irish and wonder what the Eighth Amendment is, click here.)

“I am a groupless, friendless creature in a sea of chat…”

Lauren has all the usual teenage reasons to feel awkward in her own skin, plus a few more – her mother has become principal of her all-girls school; her classmates don’t know she is bisexual; her boyfriend is a grade A git, and her capacity for critical thinking isn’t exactly going down well with her religious teachers. All this before she faces every teenage girls worst nightmare. Pregnancy with nowhere to turn is always terrible, but in a country with the most restrictive reproductive rights in the EU riddled with misinformation it is horrific. Hennessy does an admirable job of telling Lauren’s story with clarity and dignity. Lauren is a smart, acerbic girl who, while occasionally confused by her sexuality, is never ashamed of it. She is not perfect – and this is what makes her an authentic character. She is not just a cipher on which to hang an ‘issues’ book.

“I have felt trapped in this body since I was 10 years old and discovered that, contrary to the impression that Judy Blume had given me, periods were neither magical nor one-off things that happened to turn you into a woman.”

Aside from one scene (when Lauren is called to the office by her mother to discuss a personal matter, something so out of character it was jarring) this book is close to flawless YA, and excels at capturing the feeling of being different/other/wrong. One of its key strengths is the gradual revelation of many other people who feel just as alienated as Lauren – although for different reasons. Many of Lauren’s darkest moments are when she stays in her room, obsessively pouring over social media; the brightest are when she opens up to those around her. This book is a perfect promotion of the importance of open communication and friendship to mental health. YA is at its best when you know it is shining a beacon of empathy and understanding to young people who feel alone, and we have never had a book that has dealt with the reproductive realities of modern Ireland. Like Other Girls is a book that needed to be written – now it needs to be read!

Like Other Girls is published by Hot Key Books and is available in good bookstores. I received a copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. 

The Blood Miracles by Lisa McInerney – book review

0223620_the-blood-miracles_300I picked up Lisa McInerney’s debut The Glorious Heresies a few days after it was published based on the utterly brilliant cover. Shallow I know, but there you have it. Colourful graffitied Virgin Mary, glowing praise from Kevin Barry, and a blurb setting up a dark comedy realistically set in post-crash, post-Catholic Ireland – all these things were catnip to me. After practically inhaling it and pressing it on everyone who asked me for book recommendations (and many who didn’t!) I was totally convinced of McInerney’s talent. I wasn’t a bit surprised when word-of-mouth snowballed and the justified awards started rolling in. The downside of this was I awaited her next novel with Big Expectations.

“This, like so many of Ryan Cusack’s f**k-ups, begins with ecstasy”

I didn’t realise until I got my mitts on it that The Blood Miracles is a sequel of sorts – it features some of the characters from The Glorious Heresies, but works as a standalone novel also. Rather than the multiple narratives of the first book, The Blood Miracles focuses on Ryan Cusack – a half-Corkonian half- Neapolitan drug dealer, whose sociopathic boss has decided to use him to open a new black market route between Ireland and Italy. This aspect of the story could be described as ‘Love/Hate in Cork’- although infinitely better, there is the same addictive danger that made that RTE series so popular. There are enough alliances and complex transactions to keep any reader guessing, and the action comes thick and fast.

Ryan is perfectly portrayed – he is highly intelligent, complex and somehow poetic, and there is a simple tragedy in how his circumstance have led him down the path of crime. The one light in his life, his beloved girlfriend Karine, is beginning to think he is a lost cause and he is a man on a precipice…Torn between two places, two worlds, two versions of himself, it is a pleasure to watch Ryan navigate through riotous scenes of violence, clubbing, drugs, crime and sex.  All of McInerney’s characters are skilled at spinning gold into straw – Ryan is particularly good at making a hames of things, and it makes for very good reading. This is a different beast to Heresies – the focus is tighter, and it is less funny – but it is no less worthwhile (and this is from one who went in with Big Expectations). Read this one now so you can say you have when it starts showing up on award shortlists later in the year!

The Blood Miracles by Lisa McInerney is published by John Murray Press on 20th April 2017. I received a copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

 

 

Earth – an Object Lessons book review

earthI loved the sound of Earth by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Linda T. Elkins-Tanton (one of the Object Lessons series published in partnership with an essay series in The Atlantic). Object Lessons is an essay and book series about the hidden lives of ordinary things – however, this book takes a different approach to the others. We don’t often consciously think of the earth as an object, and certainly it seems incongruous listed among the other objects in the series – Bookshelf, Egg, High Heel, or Tumour for example. Earth is more philosophical than factual, a thoroughly human depiction of the Earth in the form of letters between a planetary scientist and a medievalist.

It is rare to find a truly co-disciplinary approach to any subject, but the form of this book – a back and forth of letters/skype/FB messages between Elkins-Tanton and Cohen – allows viewpoints equal weighting of disciplines while creating an interplay of ideas. Both share a fascination with the wonder of the pale blue dot we call home, and it is a pleasure to ‘eavesdrop’ on their correspondence, which is increasingly personal as a friendship develops. This book really helped me to visualise the beauty and complexity of the Earth as they examine it from different scales and perspectives, veering off into asides on beauty, perception, creativity and the imagination. The writers describe this as a “little book about an impossibly large subject”, albeit a subject every reader will view with fresh eyes for having read it. I was expecting more facts, less philosophy (although there are some science bits) but this is my favourite of the Object Lessons series I have read so far.

Earth is published by Bloomsbury Academic. I received an ecopy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

The Signal Flame by Andrew Krivák – book review

The Signal FlameSet in a small town in Pennsylvania’s Endless Mountains in 1972, The Signal Flame is a lyrical, quietly beautiful novel about a family awaiting the return of their youngest son from the Vietnam War. The family has just lost their patriarch, Jozef Vinch, who survived WWI as an Austro-Hungarian conscript and travelled to American to build a life for his family. If you have read The Sojourn you are already aware of Jozef Vinch, and of the power of Krivák’s writing – but this is not a sequel per se, and knowledge of the events of The Sojourn is not necessary.

“The trees were always the first thing his grandfather spoke of in the morning, weaving a forecast for the day based on the curve of leaves or a bird he might see nesting in the branches. Or he would tell a story that began with the planting of a particular sapling…its root pack bound in burlap and sitting in the front seat of his rig like a passenger…”

The Signal Flame centres on Jozef Vinch’s stoic grandson Bo is left to work the family’s 2000 acres of logging land and hope that this newest war will return his brother safely to him. However, Sam is MIA in Vietnam, and he has left behind a pregnant girlfriend – whose father killed Sam’s father in a hunting accident. This isn’t an action-packed plot fuelled rollercoaster – it is something more. I was utterly absorbed in this immersive portrait of a family and community in this wooded territory where the cycles of soil and weather set the rhythm of the days. There is a quiet dignity to the portrayal of grief, endurance, and the importance of forgiveness in The Signal Flame, and Krivák’s sense of pace and place is close to flawless. There is a lot of sorrow in this book, and perhaps January was not the best month to read it – so I have waited until now to recommend it to you. And I highly recommend it.

The Signal Flame is published by Scribner, who provided a free copy in return for an honest review.

The Cows by Dawn O’Porter, book review

The CowsAlthough I hadn’t read any other books by Dawn O’Porter, I was delighted to be approached to review it as I loved the sound of a fearlessly frank and funny book about how women don’t have to fall into a stereotype. The story follows three women: Tara, a single mother who makes documentary films in a misogynistic office; Cam, a childfree blogger who documents her life and loves online; and Stella, grieving the loss of her twin sister to breast cancer and facing a decision to have a prophylactic mastectomy. One night, and one very public action, creates ties that bind the three women together in unexpected ways. Lots of topics we don’t read enough of are discussed in a refreshingly frank way – single motherhood, working moms, choosing to be childfree, online dating, the pressure to conform, fake friendships, female masturbation, public shaming, trolling. It’s a heady list, and the language is realistic rather than po-faced.

First things first – this is a rattling read, clipping along at a great pace and with several laugh out loud moments. There were also a few full body cringes at times, in that delicious way that made The Office so enjoyable to watch. I wish I had read it on holiday (I wish I was on holiday!) because it’d be a great poolside read. I devoured the first half of the book in one evening, and was eager to pick it up the next day. So far so good.

Plotting issues started to become a big problem for me in the second half of the book. Stella’s story escalated from grief to elaborately Machiavellian scheming in a not particularly convincing way. As someone who has invested a lot of money in Fortress Uterus I can assure you it’s not that difficult to get knocked up, she really could have tried shagging around a bit first. Jason went from the usual level of unrealistic you can expect from a leading man (so handsome, so kind, so loyal, so amazing in bed and yet waiting for true love, so wealthy but so grounded etc etc) to just a bit of an idiot. Nevermind that is not in any way realistic that this guy would be consistently dumped by stone-cold career women when he says he wants a family (seriously, he is what every single woman I know is actively trying to meet). Are we really supposed to believe he was the only person in the UK if not the world to have seen the endless twitter, tabloid, TV, newspaper coverage of Walthamstow Wank Woman? And the biggest problem for me – Cam. This book was so baffled at what to do with an independent, successful, sexually active, loved, and childfree by choice woman that *SPOILERS after the jump!*
Continue reading “The Cows by Dawn O’Porter, book review”

Undying: A Love Story by Michel Faber

41hICu+LvaL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_I put off reading Undying because I was afraid my usually stone-cold cynical heart could not cope with it. From the queasy raw intensity of his genre defying masterpiece Under the Skin, to the sweeping Victorian expanse of The Crimson Petal and the White, something about Michel Faber’s writing grabs me utterly. His directness of tone and immersive descriptions are a heady combination – and one that made his first slim volume of poetry slightly frightening. Undying chronicles Faber’s attempts to process the six-year battle with cancer; death; and absence of, his beloved wife of 26 years Eva.

How can you say goodbye to the love of your life? How can you reconcile the wonder of finding your perfect partner with the horror of losing them in slow motion? These poems are tender and devastating – there is a vulnerability and a rawness to them that shredded my heart. Read them – and then hug your lover close, call your mother, grab your pet and give it a big snuggle – be thankful you are alive. Faber doesn’t shirk from depicting the ravages of cancer, but even the darkest of these poems are suffused with hope and love. For me, the darkest poems come after Eva has passed, as Faber struggles to adjust to a world without her in it.

All I can do, in what remains of my brief time,
is mention, to whoever cares to listen,
that a woman once existed, who was kind
and beautiful and brave, and I will not forget
how the world was altered, beyond recognition,
when we met.

Above all, these are love poems, in the deepest truest sense of the word. I read my first Michel Faber novel 17 years ago, and read all his fiction published since. I never really thought about his private life until I heard his announcement that he would not write any more fiction after Eva’s death and the publication of The Book of Strange New Things. After reading Undying, I feel I know Eva – that she was extraordinary, and that the world is a poorer place in her absence. These poems are more than a searing testimony of grief, they are a celebration of the impact we can make in life, the death-defying ripples of a life lived in kindness:

You worked covertly, nurturing by stealth.
You lifted people up, nudged them to transcend
their limitations…
You’re dead. I know. And it is not for me
to show you death is not the end.
But you left lucencies of grace secreted in the world,
still glowing.